Artscope Magazine Logo See Current Exhibitions page for the AS breaking news feed


Live daily and weekly coverage on the AS zine and A/V


 
CURRENT ISSUE CURRENT EXHIBITIONS CENTERFOLDS ZINE AUDIO/VISUAL SUBSCRIBE EMAIL BLASTS


artscope magazine: January/February 2013
WELCOME STATEMENT: Brian Goslow, managing editor
CORNERED: Sand T Kalloch
HEIGHT, WIDTH, DEPTH, TIME: BOSTON SCULPTORS CELEBRATE 20 YEARS
DOUBLE LEGACY
EXPRESSIVE PAINTING 2013
TOUCHING NEW HORIZONS
JOHN LOBOSCO: THE VISUAL JOURNEY
SILAS FINCH: AFLOAT
ESTHETIC ECSTACY
STAVEY STEERS: NIGHT HUNTER
CAROL O'MALIA: ON THEIR OWN
IMAGING THE INVISIBLE: ANGELS, DEMONS, PRAYER & WISDOM
ONCE: AN EXHIBITION OF ARTIST FELLOWSHIP RECIPIENTS
POP PARADISE: WORKS BY ARTISTS DAVE LEFNER, KELLY REEMSTEN AND ROBERT TOWNSEND
AN ALL GALLERY SHOW
KEITH LEMLEY: DREAMS OF AN IDEAL
NATHAN STEVENS
SETTING THE STAGE AT ADELSON
VERMONT'S ROUTE 7 BAEDEKER, SHELBURNE TO MIDDLEBURY
THIS NARROW DISTANCE
REVOLUTIONS: PHOTOGRAPHS OF THE ARAB SPRING BY REMI OCHLIK
IMAGING THE INVISIBLE: ANGELS, DEMONS, PRAYER & WISDOM
James Foritano


Museum of Russian Icons

203 Union Street

Clinton, Massachusetts

Through February 2



In 730 A.D., Emperor Leo III commanded that all icons in the Byzantine Empire be destroyed, and he forbade the creation of new images. Leo and his followers, infamous iconoclasts, feared that the use of images was idolatrous. Fortunately, the iconodules, led by St. John of Damascus, called a hasty conference, resulting in the 7th Ecumenical Council’s reinstating the veneration and generation of icons in 787 A.D. Thank God!



You might wonder if Leo, under the pressures of his office, ever really looked at an icon. You decide.



Nearly 60 icons are currently on display at Clinton’s Museum of Russian Icons in a special exhibition, “Imaging the Invisible: Angels, Demons, Prayer & Wisdom.” Call me an Iconodule, but to this reporter, it is apparent that only an emperor, with his nose so deep in so many other matters, could miss the depth of suggestion imaged forth from an artfully crafted icon. My opinion is that it’s not about “Believe this!” but rather about the rhetoric of artistic seduction: of line and color, movement and stasis, mass and volume — for starters.



Magnifying glasses handily placed around the gallery will focus and even beam their own light source — a talent that took your average monk years to develop — upon angels hovering around and below the principal actors of “Hymn of Axion Estin.” A quick glance, the only kind available to a busy emperor, would leave one with the impression of an orthodox icon limply synonymous with dozens of others: Mary and the Christ Child central to a more or less anonymous angelic hierarchy.


Read the entire article in our magazine pages...

 

Select an artscope issue



Now Available: the artscope Newsstand Edition -Explore interactive features
-Designed especially for iPad
-Receive new issues instantly as they become available on Apple Newsstand
-Download a FREE preview!
The Newsstand edition is live!

 


The artscope Mobile App


-Multiple live news feeds
-Explore more than 50 featured exhibits, galleries and artists
-Interact and communicate with AS and other cultural outlets

 

 

 


Share on Facebook


 

FAQ - ABOUT US/ CONTACT - ADVERTISE - CAREERS - DIGITAL EDITION - WHERE TO PICK UP A COPY - TERMS OF USE - ARTSCOPE APPS - CLASSIFIEDS - PRESS PAGE- PURCHASE COPIES   

Instagram

 



Copyright 2014 Artscope Magazine